Active Prince William

Helping to make Prince William, Manassas, and Manassas Park a More Livable, Sustainable Community.

Category: Sidewalks (page 1 of 2)

City of Manassas Grant Avenue Streetscape Plan Meeting, November 9 @ 7 PM, Georgetown South Community Center

Meeting Address:

http://www.manassascity.org/grantave

Grant Avenue Streetscape Plan

  1. Grant Ave. Streetscape meeting
  2. Grant Ave. Streetscape meeting
  3. Grant Ave. Streetscape meeting
  4. Grant Ave. Streetscape meeting

Share your ideas and vision to help improve the appearance of Grant Avenue. Planning efforts will focus on improving Grant Avenue from Lee Avenue to Wellington Road.

Nov 9 meeting

Grant Ave_Presentation_062916 1
See the June 29 first meeting Presentation

View Meeting Exhibits with Public Comments:

    Existing Conditions

    Map My Walk Aerial

    Precedent Images

    Streetmix Sections

Want to keep informed about the Grant Avenue Streetscape Plan?
Sign up for emails or messages
 
Call 703-257-8232 for more information. 

Small Area Plans – Your Opportunity to Engage

As part of the ongoing Comprehensive Plan update, the Prince William County Planning Office has created several small area plans to guide development in key areas of the county. Each small area plan may offer opportunities for improved transit, increased open space, and greater walkability.

Public outreach will be accomplished through one or more public meetings and design charrettes for each project. A charrette is a collaborative planning session among a project’s various stakeholders – in this case, government officials, consultants and/or developers, and interested members of the public. A planning outline and some anticipated outcomes are provided for each active plan at the links below. There are no upcoming public hearings or charrettes currently scheduled, but the Planning Department promises to update the website when they have been. We will monitor the website as well.

Five plans that are currently active:

Dale City
The basis for this project is two studies completed earlier this year: one by the Dale City Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) and the other under a Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (MWCOG) Transportation/Land-Use Connections (TLC) Program grant. The scope of the studies includes redevelopment of both the Dale Boulevard/Minnieville Road intersection and Mapledale Plaza at the intersection of Dale Boulevard and Queensdale Drive, as well as extensive redesign of vehicular, cycling, and walking infrastructure throughout the area.

Innovation Park
An examination of the Innovation Park area and a couple of miles of Prince William Parkway between Sudley Manor Drive and Godwin Drive/Nokesville Road, with the goal of developing Innovation Park as an economic center for PWC.

North Woodbridge
Covers US-1 between Occoquan River and Occoquan Road, north to I-95 and south to Belmont Bay Wildlife Refuge. The major issues appear to be the US-1/VA-123 interchange and multi-modal transportation options. There is currently very little usable infrastructure for non-motorized traffic in this area.

Small Area Plan: North Woodbridge

Parkway Employment Center
An update of the existing Parkway Employment Center sector plan at I-95/Horner Road/Prince William Parkway. A .pdf of the 2008 sector plan is available here.

Route 29
There is not a lot of information available for this plan yet. It will include a bike path along US-29 between US-15 and Somerset Crossing.

Future SAP projects include Independent Hill, Triangle, Yorkshire, and Fairgrounds/New Dominion.

Ryan Foster (rfoster@pwcgov.org), Community Development Manager, and David McGettigan (dmcgettigan@pwcgov.org), Long-Range Planning Manager, are the primary points of contact for questions or comments.

Active Prince William is a group of concerned citizens who advocate for improving opportunities, support, and infrastructure for active transportation and healthy lifestyles within Prince William County, Manassas, and Manassas Park. We are interested in helping to make Prince William County and Greater Manassas a more livable and sustainable Community.

Join the Manassas Community Conversations

The City of Manassas is holding a series of “Community Conversations” to gather ideas, priorities, and visions for the community’s future from individuals, families, neighbors, business professionals, and community leaders. This is your opportunity to shape Manassas by sharing your perspectives and providing input on key topics such as quality of life, services, transportation, land use, and economic development.

This community engagement process follows up on the City’s 2014 and 2016 community surveys, in which the following 10 community priorities were identified in order of importance.

 

The following engagement sessions remain:

Thursday, Sept. 7, 2 PM – Active Adults & Seniors
​​​Manassas Senior Center Board Room / 9320 Mosby Street ​​

Thursday, Sept. 7, 6PM – Families ​
​Manassas Museum / 9101 Prince William Street ​

Thursday, Sept. 21, 6 PM – Twenty & Thirty Somethings
​​​Bad Wolf Brew House / 8420 Kao Circle ​​ ​​​​

Saturday, Sept. 23, 2PM – Everyone!
​Grace Methodist Church Fellowship Hall / 9750 Wellington Road

You can also engage with City staff at the farmers markets in downtown Manassas on September 16 and 28 and October 21 and 26.

In addition, you can participate online through the City’s new online engagement portal!

The Community Conversations will dig deeper into the “why” of the top priorities to find location-specific issues and gauge if any priorities are missing from the list generated by the survey. The findings from both the survey and the Community Conversations will assist the City in updating its strategic priorities and comprehensive plan. Join the conversation!

The City of Manassas is Poised to Revamp Grant Ave with the City’s First Road Diet, Citing Pedestrian Safety Concerns

The City of Manassas is in the planning stages of a redesign of Grant Avenue, a road considered the southern gateway to downtown Manassas. Citing pedestrian safety and safe routes to schools, City staff are considering a road diet from 4 to 3 lanes with improved pedestrian sidewalks and crossings. A public meeting was held on 29 June with additional public engagement in the planning process to come in the future. Implementation of the Grant Ave Streetscape Project will also enable the city to move forward with smart growth re-development on the southern side of the city.

Streetscape Meeting

Manassas Grant Ave Streetscape Meeting

At the public meeting on 29 June, there was considerable staff, consultant, and community support for implementing a four-lane to three-lane road diet to improve walking and bicycling conditions, enhance bus stops, and increase aesthetics without significantly degrading motoring. Mayor Parrish, three current City Council members, and senior City staff were present at the meeting.

Existing Condition Comments

Manassas Grant Ave Streetscape Existing Condition Comments

At the meeting, staff guided interested individuals in using the Streetmix computer program to design alternative cross sections for Grant Ave.  While conventional bike lanes are eminently feasible and should be adequate for many bike riders with a road diet’s traffic-calming influence and a lowered 25 MPH speed limit, it was clear that the current street right of way is constrained, and expanding the sidewalk areas to include planting strips with street trees, urban street lamps, and bus shelters is an important “competing” priority that may preclude adding buffered or separated bicycle lanes.

View near Brent St.

Manassas Grant Ave view near Brent St.

While a simple road diet can often be accomplished using only maintenance funds to repave and re-paint the new lane configuration, expanding the sidewalks and planting strips, undergrounding the currently overhead utilities, and adding bus shelters, urban street lights, street furniture, trees, and other landscaping along Grant Ave will necessitate considerable construction funds.

The Initial planning and design for the project has been funded, but there’s not yet any funding allocated for construction, and thanks to HB 2 and HB 599, which target road capacity expansions, neither the Virginia Commonwealth Transportation Board (CTB) nor the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority (NVTA) are likely to provide any money for a road diet.  If construction will be locally funded, it’s unlikely that the curbs will be moved, so as to greatly reduce construction costs.  At the meeting, Active Prince William advocated for alternatives–including buffered bike lanes–that could fit within the existing roadway.

Example Road Profile

Grant Ave Streetscape Example Road Profile

For more information, visit the City’s project page [http://www.manassascity.org/grantave], where you can sign up for project updates, and view the meeting presentation which provides background information and describes how the meeting was conducted.

How to Submit a Request to Clear Debris from Sidewalks and Trails

If you walk or bike with any frequency in Northern Virginia, I am sure that you have encountered sand, dirt, gravel, grit, broken glass, etc. covering sidewalks and bike trails along our roadways. VDOT has a website for residents to submit service requests that takes only a few minutes to complete. The process is outlined below.

Debris on sidewalk before request was submitted

Photo of debris blocking sidewalk along Old Bridge Rd across from the Old Bridge/Rt 123 Commuter Parking Lot

Sidewalk after clearing by VDOT

Sidewalk after clearing by VDOT within 24 hours of submitted request.

Most roadways and their associated sidewalks and shared-use paths in Northern Virginia are managed by the Virginia Dept of Transportation (VDOT). Exceptions to this rule are where roads are privately owned, such as in some Home Owners Associations, and in some cities, towns, and Counties (such as Arlington County). Most roads in Fairfax and Prince William Counties are owned and maintained by VDOT, not the County governments; therefore, requests to fix problems on the roadways and their associated sidewalks and shared-use paths need to be directed to VDOT on their My VDOT website.

Much of the sand, gravel, grit and debris on our roadsides, curbs, sidewalks, and shared-use paths is left over from the heavy salting, sanding, and plowing that occurred back in January. VDOT does not have a scheduled maintenance program for clearing debris, but they do respond to resident’s requests.

You can easily submit a request on-line for VDOT to clear debris from specific areas that you identify. We recommend that you take a photo of the issue that you want addressed, then visit the My VDOT website.

1. Select the Type of Request

My VDOT Service Request

My VDOT Service Request Initial Page

On the My VDOT website, select “I need something removed from a road”, then on the right, under “What do you need removed?”, select “Remove debris”, then below that, under “Where is it located?” select “On the shoulder or in the ditch”. Once you have done this, click the Continue button.

2. Enter the Location

My VDOT Service Request

My VDOT Service Request Location Page

On the Location page, you will enter information about where the debris needs removal from. You can either zoom in on the map and click the location to drop a pin, or you can enter an address.  Once you have provided an accurate location, click the Continue button.

3. Add Details and a Photo

My VDOT Service Request

My VDOT Service Request Details Page

On the Details page enter any other information VDOT maintenance crews should know about the issue, such as details about the debris, or if it is blocking or impeding use of the road/sidewalk/trail. Enter a description, and be sure to mention if the debris needs clearing from a sidewalk or trail (shared-use path). Under the “Do you have an image or file to share?” section click the Choose File button to add the photo that you took of the debris, then click the Continue button.

4. Enter Contact Information

On the last page, enter your name and email address, and check the boxes if you want to be notified about status updates or create an account (both optional). You can receive status updates via email or text messages (if you provide a mobile phone number).

My VDOT Service Request

My VDOT Service Request Contact Page

You can also check the status of your submitted service requests by returning to the MyVDOT website and logging on if you created an account, or by entering a service request number.

MyVDOT Service Request Status

MyVDOT Service Request Status

NOTE: Residents can also submit service requests to VDOT for trail and sidewalk repairs, and road issues like pot holes and sign repair. The first webpage  has options for other types of requests under “How can we help you?”

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